Interview with Artist Otino Corsano

#5: Otino Corsano*

http://www.oceancoursefilms.com

Corsano is a New Genres Artist influenced by Los Angeles art practices now based in Toronto, Ontario. He works in a variety of media and his art writings and artist interviews were primarily published in artUS Magazine (LA).

Drawing inspiration from the “neo-conceptual” school enables Corsano to avoid being locked into any singular production mode. One notable series are his “Quick Draw” artist interviews that utilize Facebook’s IM Chat feature to record and document conversations with international artists (http://artpost-oc.blogspot.ca).

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Interview with Artist Justin Lincoln

This is the fourth in a series of 11 artist interviews I conducted in 2014 titled “a new space; artists and social media”. You can learn more about this academic research project at http://artistsandsocialmedia.tumblr.com/

http://justinlincoln.com

April 2014

Lincoln is an experimental artist and educator whom I have been following on Tumblr for about four years. He is a well known artist using social media and his recommendations to me on who else to contact for this project proved invaluable. Lincoln is concerned with how we are dealing with, for the first time in history, such huge influxes of data due to online networks. He describes the information we have now as “atomized” and, as artists, we take this information and combine them in new and meaningful ways. His practice is to incorporate other artist’s blogs, as well as own content, into a series of “blogmix” videos. This process started when he started to sees “likes” as a run-off of content that he did not want to share as he would lose followers through the sheer amount of diversity of this content. He then realized there is many types of liking, and wondered what it would look like if one were to speed scroll through them. Citing the Structural Film movement of the 70s, Lincoln sees film montages as mirroring the moving images one after another we see in our daily lives online.

 

Interview with Artist Brad Phillips

This is the third in a series of 11 artist interviews I conducted in 2014 titled “a new space; artists and social media”. You can learn more about this academic research project at http://artistsandsocialmedia.tumblr.com/ http://www.bradphillips.ca Phillips is a visual artist based in Toronto, Canada. Noted for his presence on social media, Phillips participated in my project due to having “definite” opinions on other artists using social media. His presence is tied to his artistic process of documenting his own life autobiographically and problematizes it by manipulation. He presents an idea, a persona of a male artist that emphasizes the cliches and leaves out the “boring shit”.

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Interview with Artist Alison Snowball

This is the second in new series of 11 artist interviews I conducted earlier this year I’ve titled “a new space; artists and social media”. You can learn more about this project at http://artistsandsocialmedia.tumblr.com/


http://alisonsnowball.com

Alison Snowball is an artist based in Toronto. I met Snowball in 2010 while we were both conducting gallery space projects in the Parkdale neighbourhood and had recently seen mention of her Chalk Form Census (http://alisonsnowball.com/art/chalk-form-census/) and TWEETHIS: An Art History Paper in 361 Tweets (http://alisonsnowball.com/art/tweethis-an-art-history-paper-in-361-tweets/) on Facebook. This was only one of two interviews in the project conducted in person.

Interview with Artist Eric Oglander

This is the first in new series of 11 artist interviews I conducted earlier this year I’ve titled “a new space; artists and social media”. You can learn more about this project at http://artistsandsocialmedia.tumblr.com/

http://www.ericoglander.com

(there is some sound degradation in parts due to audio feedback. my apologies for this).

Oglander is an emerging artist who recently moved to Brooklyn, New York and in many ways represents the fulfilment of the promise of instant fame and recognition that social media holds for many artists. His project, Craigslist Mirrors (http://craigslistmirrors.com), was started in late 2013 and almost immediately found by renowned art critic Jerry Saltz (https://twitter.com/jerrysaltz) who posted links to it on his Twitter and Facebook accounts.

[This is the first online exhibit of 2014] “How to become an abstract painter”

Welcome and congratulations on wanting to improve yourself.

All you need to start is a pre-existing figurative oil painting (can be substituted for acrylic – consult your Doctor) with an impasto flare to it. It should have at least one area that wants to leave the confines of the canvas.

how-to-abstract-paint_1

I used a still life painting of fruit that I did in 1994. At the time I was living in Montreal and going through chemotherapy. There were over 15,000 empty apartments in Montreal, so I was able to live in a loft in the old port even though I was a student. I lived beside a hydro facility with lots of wires and conductors. I took so long to do the painting that the fruit dried up and a wasp flew in through the open window and worried me.

Step 1: Preparing your Palette 

Try to use a painting with at least as interesting a backstory to it and follow the video tutorial below before proceeding to Step 2.

Step 2: The Basics

Are you done? Great!

Now it’s your turn to create a pile of the paint flakes on a neutral surface. Like this:

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Now zoom in close with your camera phone, pretending it is a wooden frame. You should end up with something that looks a bit like this:

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Don’t be afraid to take photos from different angles or mix up the paint chips a bit:

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Great! Now that you’ve got the basics of abstract painting down, we’ll move on to more advanced techniques.

Step 3: Advanced Techniques

Let’s pull that “wooden frame” out a bit to make use of negative space. Don’t be intimidated – the post-it note was invented from negative space. Steve Jobs was famous for creating negative space in the office, and so can you.

Again, express yourself by randomly mixing the paint flakes around a bit. Yes. Good. Like this:

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Look at you!

Now, let’s create some “dynamic energy” and spread our paint flakes even further, with an even larger lens. Don’t be concerned about reaching deep inside, but do keep children and small animals away from the designated creative area:

So beautiful. Don’t forgot to pin it with a link back to this tutorial.

Step 4: Master class

You are truly ready to unleash your inner artist. For this final segment, we’ll be using negative space combined with a circle shape. You may recognize a circle from your yoga class or from that power point presentation, but it has actually been used in many civilizations throughout history – and now it’s our turn!

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Give yourselves a pat on the back – now you are ready for a rich and rewarding hobby.

And don’t forget about the painting we started with! It’s now a new work too and should be mounted with glee:

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Here’s what we call a “detail”:

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Step 6: Art as an object

And that’s not the only new work you have – don’t forget about the paint chips themselves. They make a nice ornament if you put them in a glass container. I’ve used a round jar so it will go well with the circles from our master class:

photo-5

Questions or comments? Please let us know below – and we would love to see how your home abstract paintings turn out, so please feel free to share in the comments as well.