Pop-Up gallery exhibit one for the books

Open Book Group Exhibit at 21 Rebecca Street.

Hamilton purportedly has a DIY culture and attitude and that reputation has attracted many arty types like myself to this quirky rust belt city. Sometimes, the perception is not really the reality and many of us have been yearning for empty buildings downtown to be bought and turned into impromptu exhibit spaces – and only three years later, have I finally seen this happen the way many of us have been daydreaming it should happen.

Welcome to the neighbourhood, Book Club Gallery.

Located on Rebecca, just off of James Street North and in the shadow of the Jackson Square monstrosity, the Book Club Gallery was never a Book Store. It was a wool broker office, and a print shop, and a hair salon – it is currently a pleasant austere space with art by some of Hamilton’s best artists. At least for the next few weeks – who knows what the owner, Cameron, will do with the space next but having a pop-up exhibit is such a great way to fill the space in the meantime. There are a lot of empty storefronts in Hamilton, and their owners could learn a thing or two about fostering community from people like Cameron.

(Unfortunately, Hamilton has many empty storefronts because of their owners are slumlords who don’t want the “expense” of the space being used for anything. They just want to flip the property at some point in the future after people like us creative class types put in all the hard work to improve the community and thus the real estate value. The City councilors here are, in turn, kinda meta-slum lords because the home crowd in this small city all know each other and look out for their “buddies”. But things are changing because there are so many new people arriving , and we’ve see that things are better elsewhere and so things will change here. This is a kind of hostile cultural takeover. But enough of this issue at the moment..)

Back to the show – the participating artists in this exhibit, one of the best so far of 2013, are Donna Akrey, Sarah Beattie, Andrea Carvalho, Margaret Flood and Svava Thordis Juliusson.

There was a small amount of people who attended the opening, but it’s slightly off the Art Crawl beaten path. A couple of sandwich boards would address this problem nicely. Such a good show – Cameron, please consider keeping it open for the next art crawl!

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Donna Akrey’s work is sprawling and subtle. Go ahead and try to find this bear. You’ll be glad you did.

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Donna Akrey

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Andrea Carvalho – this work really takes advantage of the space, I think. These sculptural installations look like “Office Ghosts” to me. Love this.

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Margaret Flood is making some multiples of the HOV lane on the highway – the car pool lane. She’s communing to work in Toronto and making art about it. Like I did when I was commuting. This is a very real part of the landscape. Maybe there should be a group exhibit of commute art…

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Donna Akrey’s secret storage space…

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Donna Akrey

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Donna Akrey

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Donna Akrey

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Svava Thordis Juliusson – Toronto’s loss, Hamilton’s gain.

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Svava Thordis Juliusson

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Donna Akrey

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Andrea Carvalho, Margaret Flood and Svava Thordis Juliusson

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Svava Thordis Juliusson

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Svava Thordis Juliusson

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Donna Akrey

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Andrea Carvalho, Margaret Flood

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[online exhibit] Mountain Path, 2013

Instructions:

*update: I’ve added a stand-alone montage version of the work. The instructions below are for viewing each slide individually.

1) Click on the first (top left) thumbnail below to enter fullscreen slideshow mode
2) Scroll (to the right) through the slideshow until you reach the end of the path. Get comfortable: there are 170 slides, including the entry and the eventual destination.
3) You can of course jump in and out anywhere along the path you choose, at any time, but then you might miss the journey inside the experience.

Process notes:

It is important to note that this work is entirely captured, rendered and output through a mobile device and on location during one session.

Artist Statement:

For me, there are several classical and contemporary themes in the work, such as: the supernatural; a formal approach to landscape; a questioning of political / social issues involving digital topographical mapping; a spiritual journey reflecting on death. There are many other contemplations that are evoked for me when I engage the work, and hopefully there will be for the viewer as well.

I enjoy the compositions of the shadows and the rocks, as well as the idea of a digital shadow cast on real objects through a challenging process of documentation for both the tools and the artist. The stresses of this effort on the image and the human traces archived in the process are a very important part of the production philosophy for me.  I welcome comments and questions in the discussion field below where this conversation can continue.

Why exhibit online?

This series works well online I think through the intimacy of scrolling through the series of horizontal based documentation. I enjoy the ideas of creating a work while mobile and exhibiting almost immediately after production, without interference or influence – qualities in art which are actually rare to achieve and I believe warrants further practice.

Though much worthwhile art only works online, this particular show would translate well to a physical exhibition environment and I hope to mount multiple instances of Mountain Path around the world. Please contact me if you are interested in a hosting an edition/ installation of this work.

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MOUNTAIN PATH (2013)
Christopher Healey

 

Mountain Path

Mountain Path

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The Volcano Research Station: summation of a themed art collaboration

This past week I wrapped up a 10 day long project at the Visual Fringe (Festival) in Toronto. That was never in doubt. However, the evolvement of the space towards an eruption of collaborative work and the resulting potential for social / civic research was quite … unpredictable.

So, Dawn Buie and I decided to put up our own work in half the tent and that was that. I was super happy to be asked to participate and really had not been exhibiting much outside group shows and curating things.The price was right for the tent below, but then I learned a few months ago that we had to take down and pack away our stuff everynight – and to be prepared to have to move from tent to tent.

So that kinda nixed my idea to show some of my digital prints – not the right venue both practically and conceptually for this aspect of my studio work. But this was the Fringe Festival and, to my delight, I also learned that the “artist alley” was in the bar area and that lots of people come through.

So what to do with the space?

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